By By THE LEARNING NETWORK This word has appeared in 13 New York Times articles in the past year.

Source: The Learning Network

    

By GradHacker

Finding community as a graduate student with disability

Source: Inside Higher Ed Blogs

    

By Matt Reed

The questions behind the questions on developmental education.

Source: Inside Higher Ed Blogs

    

By Simon Schwartzman

OECD has just published results of its assessment of student proficiency in 45 countries and regions of problem-solving at age 15.

Source: Inside Higher Ed Blogs

    

By John Warner

America’s foremost op-ed columnist needs to decide what we’re supposed to do and stick with it.

Source: Inside Higher Ed Blogs

    

By Herman Berliner

My relaxation is watching a musical while at the same time, as an economist, I recognize the importance of the theater to the economy of New York.

Source: Inside Higher Ed Blogs

    

By Susan O’Doherty

No longer ignored.

Source: Inside Higher Ed Blogs

    

Josh Bersin,
Bersin by Deloitte,
April 20, 2014


Take note: “Wiley has repositioned itself significantly and is making major investments in the markets for corporate and individual professional development. Over the last several years Wiley acquired Inscape (DISC assessment products), Profiles International (prehire and team assessments), Deltak (learning management system and student relationship platform for the education industry), and now CrossKnowledge, a fast-growing provider of corporate e-learning, LMS, and content management solutions.”

[Link] [Comment]

Source: Downes

    

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Black Duck Software,
Slideshare,
April 19, 2014


Slideshare slide deck. From the summary: “The eighth annual Future of Open Source Survey results, presented by Black Duck and North Bridge, point toward the increased strategic role that open source plays in today’ s enterprises, its crucial function within new technology development, and the growth of both first-time developers within the OSS community and the impact open source has in daily life.” The overall message: “Open source continues to eat the software world.”

[Link] [Comment]

Source: Downes

    

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Clarence Fisher,
Remote Access,
April 18, 2014


I don’t think this metaphor works. I accept that “personal blogging is retreating in favour of corporate social media sites such as Facebook, twitter, and tumblr.” But it isn’t clear to me that “Just as vinyl records are still listened to, and considered better than the digital format, they exist without having a real impact on the music industry.” I think that the internet would be very different without blogs. There has to be more to life than Upworthy and Huffington Post.

[Link] [Comment]

Source: Downes

    

By Monica Burns

Edutopia blogger Monica Burns provides another handy resource list of mobile apps, this time focusing on digital flashcards that can help students learn and review a wide range of subjects.

When children are told to “go home and study,” many aren’t quite sure what this means. “Do I stare at the pages of a textbook? Should I redo old homework problems? Will I remember this new list of vocabulary words if I read them over and over?” Giving students the tools to develop study skills is one step in the right direction.

read more

Source: Edutopia

    

Alan Levine,
CogDogBlog,
April 18, 2014


Alan Levine is not too pleased with the new Flickr interface. Neither, for that matter, am I. It’s getting increasingly difficult to do the things with photos that give them meaning, like adding notes and comments. The ‘sets’ have been renamed ‘albums’ and are basically invisible now. I’m not sure how people can view my photos, if at all, other than through the photostream.

[Link] [Comment]

Source: Downes

    

By Stacey Goodman

Edutopia blogger Stacey Goodman proposes teachers help students see themselves as agents of imagination and members of communities larger than themselves, creating a foundation for a visionary curriculum.

“The future belongs to those who see possibilities before they become obvious.” – John Scully

“Looking up gives light, although at first it makes you dizzy.” – Rumi

Can you teach students to be visionary? Can visionary thinking even be taught? Most of us might believe that being able to imagine possibility in the way that moves and inspires people is a mystical or unknowable human quality. Yet, by helping our students see themselves as agents of imagination and members of communities larger than themselves, teachers can create a foundation for a visionary curriculum.

read more

Source: Edutopia

    

Press Release,
British Pathé,
April 18, 2014


Another huge resource for open learning. “Newsreel archive British Pathé has uploaded its entire collection of 85,000 historic films, in high resolution, to its YouTube channel. This unprecedented release of vintage news reports and cinemagazines is part of a drive to make the archive more accessible to viewers all over the world.” Among the favourtes are Wright Brothers First Flight (1903), Hindenburg Disaster Real Footage (1937) [HD] and Arnold Schwarzenegger Wins Mr Universe (1969)

[Link] [Comment]

Source: Downes

    

Neurobonkers,
Big Think,
April 18, 2014


People like me sometimes are inclined to think that if people had more and better education, they would not believe anti-scientific myths. For example, they they were told that the Sun is in a cooling cycle, they would not be inclined to blame Sun cycles for global warming. Actual evidence, however, suggests that people continue to believe myths despite the scientific evidence. Myths provide explanations, and merely debunking a myth leaves a gap in that explanation. In some cases, the provision of evidence contrary to the myth can actually strengthen their belief in the myth. Why do I raise this? Education is not a magic remedy for misinformation. See also the Debunking Handbook (PDF) by John Cook and Stephan Lewandowsky.

[Link] [Comment]

Source: Downes

    

By John Warner

I’m seeing a record number of student face crumbles.

Source: Inside Higher Ed Blogs

    

By Judy Willis MD

Edutopia blogger Judy Willis looks at three edtech product review sites – EdSurge, ClassroomWindow and CommonSense Media – and compares their usefulness in providing teachers with a comprehensive picture of how to find the best available tools.

Recently I evaluated three nonprofit sites that provide evaluations of online game-based skill or fact practice.

All three are on the right track, but only one offered the specific educator-directed professional evaluation needed to guide teachers in choosing the best of these resources. The other two had limitations, such as inadequate documentation from specialists with expertise in child development or education, no clear rubrics used for evaluation of websites, and/or murky details of applications and suitability for individual students and topics.

read more

Source: Edutopia

    

By Doug Lederman

Virginia’s Supreme Court says U. of Virginia was within its rights under state law not to release emails of climate change researcher.

Source: Inside Higher Ed

    

By Colleen Flaherty

New AAUP report accuses U. of Colorado-Boulder administrators of violating academic freedom in their reaction to a sexism investigation of philosophy department this year.

Editorial Tags:

Source: Inside Higher Ed

    

By Doug Lederman

  • Stephen R. Adkison, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Eastern Oregon University, has been appointed provost and vice president for academic affairs at Henderson State University, in Arkansas.
  • Eric J. Barron, president of Florida State University, has been chosen as president of Pennsylvania State University.

Source: Inside Higher Ed

    

By Ry Rivard

Dartmouth College, which for decades has been viewed as the rowdiest of the Ivy League colleges, is trying again to change its campus culture.

Source: Inside Higher Ed

    

By Allie Grasgreen

Another football player boycott — this time over the reinstatement of a head coach — raises questions over what athletes will and should be able to decide if they end up unionizing.

Editorial Tags:
Image Source:
Minnesota State University at Mankato
Image Caption:
The Minnesota State University at Mankato football team takes the field.

Source: Inside Higher Ed

    

By Ashley Sanders

Beyond budgeting.

Source: Inside Higher Ed Blogs

    

By Eric Stoller

Cosmos is a subversive television show…and I love it.

Source: Inside Higher Ed Blogs

    

By Brian Sztabnik

Guest blogger Brian Sztabnik isolates four steps to becoming a better writer – Purpose, Organization, Evidence and Thesis (POET) – and, with this prewriting exercise, encourages his students to ‘be POETs’ before writing their essays.

Clarity. It is what we long for when we travel through a student’s essay. Yet our struggling writers make us wander through a cluttered maze of thoughts, leading to dead ends.

We want an awareness of purpose. We want ideas to progress in logical order. We want sentences to be fluid and confident, not stuffed with words desperate to impress. We want so much because good writing is multidimensional. So how to encourage this? Rubrics are uninspiring and often contain too much information for students to digest. The question remains: how do we give students guidelines without glutting their minds with a 50-item checklist?

read more

Source: Edutopia

    

Frances Bell,
Francesbell’s Blog,
April 17, 2014


Fances Bell explores some of the murky issues surrounding access to ‘closed’ sites and services such as Facebook groups. These are not accessible to people without a Facebook login, and as such may be inaccessible to people who for one reason or another don’t want Facebook. But also as such, these may carry a presumption of privacy on the part of members, some of whom may think posting to the course group isn’t ‘public’ in the way posting a blog port or web page is. Meanwhile, can you post what was said on one Facebook group (or mailing list, or whatever) on another Facebook group? What if it’s a ‘closed’ (members only) group? Tough questions.

[Link] [Comment]

Source: Downes

    

By Hunter Maats and Katie O’Brien

Guest bloggers Hunter Maats and Katie O’Brien explain how there are no bad test takers, but stress responses are real. Students can learn how to reset the visceral distraction of feelings that inhibit their test performance.

Every year, the stress of school reaches a fever pitch during standardized-testing season. Whether it’s the SAT, APs or end-of-grade testing, teachers race to re-impart all the knowledge covered, parents dump boulder-sized practice books onto the dining room table, and students who were happily coasting along become acutely aware that the academic equivalent of Judgment Day is nigh.

read more

Source: Edutopia

    

By Tracy Mitrano

A missed opportunity for a real discussion of internet security.

Source: Inside Higher Ed Blogs

    

Audrey Watters,
Hack Education,
April 17, 2014


Audrey Watters announces the arrival of her online publishing venture with Will Richardson and Bruce Dixon, Educating Modern Learners, “a site dedicated to news and analysis about the future of teaching and learning through a progressive education (and progressive ed-tech) lens.” It will, sadly, cost you $35 a month to read. Not open content, obviously.

[Link] [Comment]

Source: Downes

    

Stephen Marche,
Los Angeles Review of Books,
April 17, 2014


I don’t think there’s anything wrong with the digital humanities per se but I accept the criticism that it would represent a misapplication of big data. As Stephen Marche writes, “Literature cannot meaningfully be treated as data. The problem is essential rather than superficial: literature is not data. Literature is the opposite of data.” In particular, “algorithms, exactly like fascism, work perfectly, with a sense of seemingly unstoppable inevitability, right up until the point they don’ t.`Well fine. But why is this the case? I would say that it’s because data (as we know it) is about mass, while meaning is based on context and connection.

[Link] [Comment]

Source: Downes